Sport NZ - ihi Aotearoa - Sport New Zealand
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Frequently asked questions

Answers to the questions we get asked most often...

Coaching

Drugs in sport

Funding

Getting active

High performance sport 

Jobs and training

Legal

Officials

Organisations

People with disabilities

Publications

Research

Sport New Zealand

Sport in NZ

Young people

Answers to the questions we get asked most often...

Coaching

How do I become a coach? Where can I find coaching resources?

Contact the national sport organisation (NSO) for the sport you are interested in coaching.

You'll find lots of resources for coaches on this website - go to the Coaching area and use the left-hand menu to browse.

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Drugs in sport

What is doping?

'Anti-Doping Rule Violations' are defined in Article 2 of the World Anti-Doping Code (PDF, 230 KB), World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) website. These violations include the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in an athlete's bodily specimen, the attempted use of a prohibited substance, refusing a test, tampering with a sample, trafficking and assisting others to dope.

You can find more information on doping on the websites of Drug Free Sport New Zealand and the International Olympic Committee.

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Where can I find information and websites on anti-doping and drugs in sport?

Drug Free Sport New Zealand is dedicated to providing a sporting environment that is free of banned doping methods for New Zealand sport and athletes. Drug Free Sport NZ works with national sport organisations (NSOs) and other key agencies to deter the use of banned substances through effective drug testing procedures, education and research programmes. They also have an 0800 DRUG FREE number for athletes, coaches and managers.

The Drug Free Sport NZ website is packed with information about banned substances, education resources and news about doping in sport. We recommend that you have a look at the site, whether you are a coach, manager, official or athlete.

The Sports Tribunal of New Zealand is the principal hearing body for anti-doping violations in New Zealand. The Sports Tribunal website contains information about the tribunal and copies of all its decisions.

For more information on anti-doping programmes, try the following websites:

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What's being done about drugs in sport in New Zealand?

Background: The New Zealand response to issues around performance-enhancing drugs began in 1988, in the aftermath of the Seoul Olympics, under the leadership of the New Zealand Olympic and Commonwealth Games Association. Following a review by the Hillary Commission, The New Zealand Sports Drug Agency (NZSDA) was established as a committee of the Hillary Commission. Then, in 1995 the NZSDA was established as a Crown Entity under the New Zealand Sports Drug Agency Act 1994.

In October 2005, the New Zealand Sports Drug Agency changed its name to Drug Free Sport New Zealand - a name that reflects the mission and vision of the agency more precisely.

About Drug Free Sport New Zealand: The Drug Free Sport New Zealand website outlines the mission and history of the agency. It also contains testing statistics by sport, with details of positive tests and what action was taken. The site lists banned and permitted substances, with specific sections covering asthma medication, over-the-counter medications and marijuana. The FAQ page explains how testing is conducted in New Zealand. The site has specific resources for national sport organisations (NSOs). About the Sports Tribunal: The Sports Tribunal of New Zealand is the principal hearing body for anti-doping violations in New Zealand. Its website provides information on recent decisions and includes media releases.

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What's being done internationally about drugs in sport?

The World Anti Doping Agency (WADA) works with the International Olympic Committee, national Olympic committees, international sports federations, national anti-doping organisations and the athletes themselves to deter doping by coordinating a comprehensive anti-doping programme at the international level. WADA published the World Anti-Doping Code (PDF, 230 KB) in 2003, after a Resolution that accepts the Code as the basis for the fight against doping in sport was adopted by all major sports federations and nearly 80 governments at the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Copenhagen, Denmark. All countries and sports must adopt the Code to be able to compete at the Olympic Games.

In October 2005, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) finalised the International Convention Against Doping in Sport, an international treaty that governments can adopt as a sign of their commitment to applying the WADA code in their countries. New Zealand accepted the Convention on 23 December 2005.

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Funding

How can my organisation access funding from Sport NZ?

Sport NZ's investment approach means we don't provide grants to individuals. Instead, we work in partnership with key organisations: national sport organisations, national recreation organisations, regional sports trusts and local authorities.

You can read more about how we provide funding on our Funding and investment page. If you're an individual, you can make use on an online database of potential funding sources: Potential sources of funding.

If you are a high performance athlete, coach, official or support team member, you can find out about the support and services we provide in the High Performance Sport section.

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What is the Rural Travel Fund and who can apply?

Sport NZ's Rural Travel Fund is designed to subsidise travel for junior teams participating in local sport competitions. The Rural Travel Fund is open to rural sports clubs and rural school teams in council areas that have less than 10 people per square kilometre (it isn't available to individuals). It is managed and distributed by councils - you need to contact your local council to apply.

To find out more, including which council areas are eligible, read the Rural Travel Fund information in the Communities & Clubs section of this website.

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Who is eligible to apply to Sport NZ for funding under the Iwi Grants Scheme?

The following are eligible: iwi authorities, runanga, trust boards, kura, kohanga reo, national Maori sporting bodies and Maori recreational organisations. Contact your local He Oranga Poutama kaiwhakahaere to apply.

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Getting Active

Where can I find resources and ideas on ways to get more active?

Look in the Communities and Clubs section of this website. You'll find interactive tools, downloads, activity plans and an order form for getting hold of Push Play gear. If you've got kids, also check out the Young People section.

Your regional sports trust can help with ideas and resources that will help you get more active. Regional sports trusts are Sport NZ's partners in the community and they're there to help you!

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How can I find out what sport and recreation events are on?

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How do I get in touch with a sports club in my area?

Contact the relevant national sport organisation that you are interested in and it will be able to direct you to your local club.

Also talk to your local council - they are likely to have lists of sports clubs.

Your local regional sport trust can help with any future enquiries about getting more active in your community. Regional sports trusts are Sport NZ's partners in the community and they're there to help you!

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What is Push Play?

Push Play was a former Sport and Recreation New Zealand initiative that aimed to get New Zealanders off the sofa and into a more active life. Push Play was based on research that showed that everyone can benefit from physical activity - even small amounts. Just 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most days of the week will put bounce back into your life. You'll feel better and be healthier.

  • Learn more about Push Play in the Communities and Clubs area of this site.
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What is Sport NZ doing to help increase physical activity for Maori?

Sport NZ has a programme called He Oranga Poutama, which aims to increase physical activity by Maori in Aotearoa.

Success in increasing physical activity is achieved through evidence-based planning, strategic partnering between organisations, getting good information to communities and providing kaupapa Maori activities. Also important is promoting active transport and sport and recreational opportunities.

Local organisations have appointed kaiwhakahaere whose main role is to ensure that sports and recreation programmes achieve good outcomes for Maori. Read more about He Oranga Poutama in the Communities & Clubs section of this site.

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High performance sport

What sporting scholarships are available to individuals in high-performance sport?

The High Performance Sport section of this website has information on:

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Which athletes are carded athletes?

A carded athlete is an athlete who is either from a carded sport or has a personal grant from High Performance Sport New Zealand (HPSNZ) and holds a valid card. Find out more about the carding system and read a list of athletes who are currently carded in the High Performance Sport section of this website.

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Jobs and training

How can I find out about vacancies in sport and recreation in New Zealand?

See Sport NZ's Vacancies section. This lists jobs across the sport and recreation sector in New Zealand, jobs at Sport NZ and some high-level international vacancies.

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Where can I get information about training and qualifications that will enable me to work in the sport, fitness and leisure industry in New Zealand?

  • Skills Active (the Sport, Recreation and Fitness Industry Training Organisation) has information about qualifications and training.
  • KiwiQuals is a government website that lists all tertiary qualifications available in New Zealand. You can search by keyword; level of course, type of institution and more. More than 200 sports-related courses are listed.
  • The New Zealand Recreation Association (NZRA) has information about the training and resources they provide for professional people and organisations.
  • Career Services has information to help you make decisions about which job, training or career path is right for you.
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Legal

What are the legal obligations and liabilities of event organisers and sporting organisations in New Zealand?

There are guidelines in the Policy section of our website that provide further information:

See also Guidelines for Risk Management in Sport and Recreation. This is available through the Standards New Zealand website.

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Where can I get information about the Sports Tribunal?

The New Zealand Sports Tribunal has its own website at: www.sportstribunal.org.nz.

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Officials

How do I become a sports official (referee/umpire)?

Sports officials are usually recruited, trained and coordinated by the regional sporting organisations. Many sports provide introductory training and support to help get you started as an official. If you don't know the contact details for your regional organisation contact the National Sporting Organisation - they should be able to help. There is a shortage of officials in many sports so they would love to hear from you!

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What are my legal obligations as a sports official (referee/umpire)?

In the modern sporting environment there is a greater awareness of individual rights and of sports' obligations towards health and safety. We have produced a booklet entitled "Legal Issues and Risk Management for Sports Officials" (PDF) which highlights the legal obligations of officials and how best to meet those obligations. For a free hard copy, contact your regional sports trust.

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(PDF, 542 Kb)

Organisations

What are the regional sports trusts and what do they do?

Regional sports trusts are Sport NZ's partners in the community. They deliver our programmes at a local level and distribute resources (you can contact them to request drink bottles, t-shirts, hacky sacks etc, and some pamphlets and publications).

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How can I contact the New Zealand Secondary School Sports Council?

Visit the New Zealand Secondary School Sports Council website

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Where can I get information about the Sports Tribunal?

The New Zealand Sports Tribunal has its own web site at: www.sportstribunal.org.nz.

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How do I start a sports club in my area?

Information about starting a club is available in our Publications section. In this section there are a number of useful documents about the following programmes:

  • The Running Sport 1 programme is aimed at club level administrative activity - primarily the club committee, which is generally responsible for both the policymaking and operational aspects of the club
  • Running Sport 2 is the second level of Sport NZ's sports leadership programme - targeted at regional and national sports organisations.

For further information, please contact your local regional sports trust or the relevant national sport organisation.

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How can I contact a national sport organisation (NSO)?

See our list of national sport organisations - it gives you website links, email addresses and other contact details.

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People with disabilities

What is Sport NZ's policy and strategic plan for New Zealanders with a disability?

No Exceptions is Sport NZ's policy for people with a disability in New Zealand. It provides guidelines to enable people with a disability to have access to quality sports experiences and provides common goals for people working in the area.

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Where can I find information about people with disabilities and their rights in sport?

The No Exceptions Strategy is intended to guide the strategies and actions of all agencies involved in the provision of physical recreation and sport opportunities for disabled people.

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Publications

Where can I find Sport NZ publications?

Visit the Publications section.

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How can I get copies of Sport NZ publications?

Printed copies of many of our publications can be ordered through your local regional sports trust. However, most of our publications are available on this website:

  • The Active Movement brochures are for parents and early childhood teachers. They cover a range of activities for 0 to 5 year olds to help with healthy development.
  • Active Schools resources are for primary and intermediate schools to use to improve physical activity opportunities and experiences for children. (Use the left-hand menu to browse.)
  • Sportfit resources are for secondary school teachers, students and their parents. They encourage 13 to 18 year olds to be physically active throughout their lives. 
  • All our research material is in the Research area of the site. Use the left-hand menu to browse around and find out about trends in kiwis' participation in sport, what obstacles to action have been identified and which sports are most popular.
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Research

Do you have any information on sport participation by New Zealanders?

The Active New Zealand 2007/2008 Survey is the most thorough and robust national level survey of sport and recreation participation ever done in this country and the first to be published since 2001. A total of 4,443 face-to-face interviews were conducted over a 12 month period. The survey includes the national picture, participation figures by individual sport, breakdowns by ethnicity, age, gender, and activity levels.

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What is the economic and social impact of sport?

For New Zealand information, see The Growing Business of Sport and Leisure (Hillary Commission, 2000). For an Australian review of Australian, New Zealand, and international research see The Social Impacts of Sport and Physical Recreation: an Annotated Bibliography (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2001).

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(PDF, 372 Kb)

Sport New Zealand 

How is Sport New Zealand funded?

Sport NZ receives revenue from two main sources - the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board and direct Vote funding from the Government.  For more information, see our Statement of Intent.

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What is Sport NZ's legal status?

Sport NZ is a Crown entity (meaning it is responsible to the government and people of New Zealand).

Find out more in the About Sport NZ  area of this website.

Find out more about the Minister for Sport and Recreation in the official website of the New Zealand government.

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What is Sport NZ's Statement of Intent?

Sport NZ's Statement of Intent (SOI) is essentially a planning document that sets out what we aim to achieve over the next three years, and the milestones we'll use to measure our progress.

Sport NZ's Statement of Intent also sets out how government funds are being invested in the sport and recreation sector.

You can read our Statement of Intent in the Corporate publications area of this website.

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Who is the CEO of Sport NZ and who are the top-level managers?

You can find out about our leadership team in the 'About Sport NZ' area of this website.

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Sport in New Zealand

How do I register a new sport?

There is no organisation in New Zealand that requires the registration of a new sport - but if you intend to establish an incorporated society, company or charitable trust to administer it, then information and an application needs to be made to the Registrar of Incorporated Societies. You may also find that it makes sense to partner with an existing national sports organisation if the code you wish to start up is a derivative of a sport that already has a structure established.

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What are the names of New Zealand's national sporting teams?

New Zealand national sports teams that have nicknames include:

  • Basketball: Tall Blacks (Men's team) Tall Ferns (Women's team)
  • Cricket: Black Caps (Men's team) White Ferns (Women's team)
  • Hockey: Black Sticks (Women's team)
  • Ice Hockey: Ice Blacks (Men's team)
  • Netball: Silver Ferns (Women's team)
  • Paralympics: Wheelblacks (Men's Wheelchair Rugby team)
  • Rugby League: Kiwis (Men's team) Kiwi Ferns (Women's team)
  • Rugby: All Blacks (Men's team) Black Ferns (Women's team)
  • Soccer: All Whites (Men's team)
  • Softball: Black Sox (Men's team) White Sox (Women's team)
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Young people

Where do I find physical activity resources/guidelines for children?

A wide range of information, guidelines and resources are available in the Young Persons section.

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What is KiwiSport and how can it help my child to play sport?

KiwiSport is a fund to help schools and communities ensure more school-aged children are playing sport. The Government is investing about $20 million per annum into schools and communities with the clear goals of;

  • Increasing the number of school-aged children participating in organised sport
  • Increasing the availability and accessibility of sport opportunities for all school-aged children.
  • Supporting children in developing skills that will enable them to participate effectively in sport.

$12 million of the Kiwisport is invested directly into schools by the Ministry of Education, while the other $8 million is distributed to communities by regional sports trusts. Sport NZ is responsible for administering the Kiwisport fund to regional sports trusts.

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Where can I get a copy of SportSCID (Sports Coordinator Information Database)?

SportSCID is a Microsoft Excel database that you can download for FREE to assist the Sports Department in your school with the day to day running of your Sports Programme. It is available through the New Zealand Secondary School Sports Council.

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